Crowds of mostly women climbing the stairs to fit onto an omnibus

Richmond WW1 Diary 13 May 1917

London bus drivers strike |  In May 1917, Richmond was affected by the London-wide strike by bus drivers. Unrest had been growing as the war dragged on and wages failed to keep pace with the rising costs of food and basic necessities. In February 1915 in Scotland, Clydeside armament workers went out for higher pay.…

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Richmond WW1 Diary 29 August 1916

The funeral of Mrs Christmas An article in the Richmond & Twickenham Times recorded the funeral of Mrs Christmas of 2 St John’s Cottages, Kew. Alice Christmas had been working out of the Acton Garage for the London General Omnibus Company when she was killed in an omnibus accident in Fulham. Her funeral was attended by 32…

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Richmond WW1 Diary 8 May 1915

Richmond women join the war effort The lives of many women changed dramatically during the war. The Suffragette movement had gained momentum before war began and its supporters and opponents continued to be publicly active, though efforts of both parties were now firmly focussed towards helping with war work. The absence of men opened up…

Dorothy Hardy and several unknown colleagues

Richmond’s forgotten WW1 stories

Forgotten stories One of the items featured in the Museum of Richmond First World War exhibition, as well as in our schools learning resources, is the MBE awarded to Dorothy Hardy. It was loaned by Dorothy’s daughter, Jean. Dorothy was one of nine children of the successful artist Thomas Bush Hardy. During the First World…

a line of vans with the Whitehead company logo c1916-18

Richmond WW1 aircraft factories

Alongside all the despair and destruction caused by the Great War, there were positive impacts on development in certain fields. There were advancements in medical science, including plastic surgery and prosthetics used to treated wounded soldiers. Communication technology, particularly radios, developed rapidly to meet the demands of the military. And aviation was transformed from an amateur…

Workers outside the Pelabon Factory in Twickenham

Belgian WW1 refugees arrive in Richmond

When Belgium was invaded in August 1914, thousands of refugees fled. Many came to Britain, supported by charities and the government. In Richmond the Cercle Français became the core of the Refugee Support Committee. Local businessmen and their wives formed groups in the sister boroughs of Teddington and Barnes, and set up hostels for refugees.…